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PEOPLE WHO DO NOT HAVE AN ACCEPTABLE STANDARD OF HEALTH ACCORDING TO IMMIGRATION MEDICAL AUCKLAND

If you or any family member included in your application does not have an acceptable standard of health according to immigration medical Auckland, your application will be declined, unless our nz immigration medical doctors grant you a medical waiver.

While applying for a temporary visa application, acceptable standards of health (ASH) must be met. However, in case, your visa duration is short, acceptable standard of health (ASH) will not be scrutinized as for a residential visa.

If you require hospitalization, residential care, high-cost pharmaceuticals, and/or high-cost disability services, your temporary visa application will be rejected.

If you are not meeting ASH while applying for a residential visa, you are required to apply for a medical waiver. We’ll assist you to give you a medical waiver to get residential visa.

Following is the list of health conditions that do not meet ASH;

  • HIV infection;
  • Hepatitis B-surface antigen positive and meeting criteria for anti-viral treatment in New Zealand;
  • Hepatitis C-RNA positive and meeting criteria for anti-viral treatment in New Zealand;
  • Malignancies of organs, skin (such as melanoma) and hematopoietic tissue, including past history of, or currently under treatment.

Exceptions are:

  • Treated minor skin malignancies;
  • Malignancies where the interval since treatment is such that the probability of recurrence is greater than 10 percent.
  • Requirement for organ transplants (with the exclusion of corneal grafts), or following organ transplant when immune suppression is required (with the exclusion of corneal grafts);
  • Severe, chronic or progressive renal or hepatic disorders;
  • Musculoskeletal diseases or disorders such as osteoarthritis with a high probability of surgery in the next five years;
  • Severe, chronic or progressive neurological disorders, including but not exclusive to:
  • Any dementia including Alzheimer’s disease;
  • Poorly controlled epilepsy;
  • Complex seizure disorder;
  • Cerebrovascular disease;
  • Cerebral palsy;
  • Paraplegia, quadriplegia;
  • Poliomyelitis;
  • Parkinson’s disease;
  • Motor neuron disease, Huntington’s disease, muscular dystrophy;
  • Prion disease;
  • Relapsing and/or progressive multiple sclerosis.
  • Cardiac diseases, including but not exclusive to:
  • Severe ischemic heart disease;
  • Cardiomyopathy;
  • Valve disease with a high probability of surgical and/or other procedural intervention in the next five years;
  • An aortic aneurysm with a high probability of surgical and/or other procedural intervention in the next five years;
  • Chronic respiratory disease, including but not exclusive to:
  • Severe and/or progressive restrictive (including interstitial) lung disease;
  • Severe and/or progressive obstructive lung disease;
  • Cystic fibrosis;
  • Significant or disabling hereditary disorders, including but not exclusive to:
  • Hereditary anemia and coagulation disorders;
  • Primary immune-deficiencies
  • Gaucher’s disease
  • Severe autoimmune disease which may require treatment in New Zealand with immune-suppressant medications other than Prednisone, Methotrexate, Azathioprine or Salazopyrine;
  • Severe hearing loss or profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss after the best possible correction from country of origin, where significant support is required, including cochlear implants;
  • Severe vision impairment with visual acuity of 6/36 or beyond after best possible correction at country of origin, or a loss restricting the field of vision to 15-20 degrees where significant support is required;
  • Severe developmental disorders or severe cognitive impairments where significant support is required, including but not exclusive to:
  • Physical disability;
  • Intellectual disability;
  • Autistic spectrum disorders;
  • Brain injury;
  • Major psychiatric illness and/or addiction including any psychiatric condition that has required hospitalization and/or where significant support is required;
  • Those with a history, diagnostic findings or treatment for MDR-TB or XDR-TB, unless they have been cleared by a New Zealand Respiratory or Infectious Diseases specialist upon review of their file or review of the applicant according to the New Zealand Guidelines for Tuberculosis Treatment.
  • If these medical conditions are evident (in most instances further reports from specialists are required to confirm this), then the applicant’s condition will be deemed to impose a significant cost and/or demand on the provision of New Zealand’s health services and therefore the individual will fail the requirement to demonstrate a satisfactory standard of health.

Other case with failed ASH:

  • In the case of acute medical conditions, there is a relatively high probability that the condition or group of conditions will require health services costing more than NZD 41,000.00 within five years from the date the assessment is made; or
  • In the case of chronic recurring medical conditions, over the predicted course of the condition or group of conditions, there is a relatively high probability that the condition or group of conditions will require health services costing more than NZD 41,000.00; or
  • The Ministry of Education has determined that there is a relatively high probability that the applicant’s physical, intellectual, sensory, or behavioral condition or group of conditions would entitle them to Ongoing and Reviewable Resourcing Schemes (ORRS) funding; or
  • There is a relatively high probability that the applicant’s medical condition or group of conditions will require health services for which the current demand in New Zealand is not being met (irrespective of actual service costs).

If any immigrant is not meeting the ASH according to immigration medical Auckland, it’s not necessary that immigrant will not qualify for the residential visa.

Medical Waivers – Residence Class Visas

Your immigrant officer will not reject your application automatically, they must consider the circumstances of the applicant to decide whether they are compelling enough to justify allowing entry to, and/or a stay in New Zealand.

The facts the immigration officer will take into account while deciding whether to grant a medical waiver or not are following; 

  • The degree to which the applicant would impose significant costs and/or demands on New Zealand’s health or education services;
  • Whether the applicant has immediate family lawfully and permanently resident in New Zealand and the circumstances and duration of that residence;
  • Whether the immigrant’s potential contribution to New Zealand will be significant;

The length of intended stay (including permanently or temporarily).

109 Doctors:

If you are seeking for a medical waiver, our staff will help you to apply for a medical waiver according to immigration medical Auckland. We are proud of our professional, expert Immigration medical examination team and our staff is well trained. 

Please book your appointment with our clinic. We’re conveniently located at Level 3, 109 Queen Street, Auckland CBD.

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